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  • Danielle Hibbs

Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow!

Updated: Apr 25

Hello there, Adventurer!  

It has been a while since our previous post. I am so happy you are here to read my final blog post with the WC Witness. In this final post, we will be discussing D&D classes, sharing another favorite recipe from our D&D cookbook, and we have a recorded D&D session with our own Communication Arts professor, Bekah Wall. This is going to be a fantastic finale! 

 

To get started, I am going to discuss the D&D classes. There are numerous classes, and it depends on which type of system you are playing on. For the basic rules (5E), there are 12 classes. These basic rules include Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizard. With Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, you can play an Artificer class. And finally, with Critical Role, you can play a Blood Hunter class. 

Each of these classes has pros and cons to their abilities. I will share with you what is written directly from the D&D Beyond website so that their descriptions are clear and concise: 

 

Basic Rules 

A Barbarian is described as “[a] fierce warrior who can enter a battle rage.” Their hit die is a d12, their primary ability is strength, and their saving abilities are strength and constitution. 


A Bard is described as “[a]n inspiring magician whose power echoes the music of creation.” Their hit die is a d8, their primary ability is charisma, and their saving abilities are dexterity and charisma. 

A Cleric is described as “[a] priestly champion who wields divine magic in service of a higher power.” Their hit die is a d8, their primary ability is wisdom, and their saving abilities are wisdom and charisma. 

A Druid is “[a] priest of the Old Faith, wielding the powers of nature and adopting animal forms.” Their hit die is a d8, their primary abilities is wisdom, and their saving abilities are intelligence and wisdom. 

A Fighter is “[a] master of martial combat, skilled with a variety of weapons and armor.” Their hit die is a d10, their primary abilities are strength or dexterity, and their saving abilities are strength and constitution. 

A Monk is “[a] master of martial arts, harnessing the power of the body in pursuit of physical and spiritual perfection.” Their hit die is a d8, their primary abilities are dexterity and wisdom, and their saving abilities are strength and dexterity. 


A Paladin is “[a] holy warrior bound to a sacred oath.” Their hit die is a d10, their primary ability is strength and charisma, and their saving abilities are wisdom and charisma. 

A Ranger is “[a] warrior who combats threats on the edge of civilization. Their hit die is a d10, their primary abilities are dexterity and wisdom, and their saving abilities are strength and dexterity. 


A Rogue is “[a] scoundrel who uses stealth and trickery to overcome obstacles and enemies.” Their hit die is a d8, their primary ability is dexterity, and their saving abilities are dexterity and intelligence.  

A Sorcerer is “[a] spellcaster who draws on inherent magic from a gift or bloodline.” Their hit die is a d6, their primary ability is charisma, and their saving abilities are constitution and charisma.  

A Warlock is “[a] wielder of magic that is derived from a bargain with an extraplanar entity”. Their hit die is a d8, their primary ability is charisma, and their saving abilities are wisdom and charisma. 

A Wizard is “a scholarly magic-user capable of manipulating the structures of reality.” Their hit die is a d6, their primary ability is intelligence, and their saving abilities are intelligence and wisdom.  


Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything


An Artificer are “[m]asters of invention, artificers use ingenuity and magic to unlock extarordinary capabilities in objects.” Their hit die is a d8, their primary ability is intelligence, and their saving abilities are constitution and intelligence. 


Critical Role


A Blood Hunter is “[w]illing to suffer whatever it takes to achieve victory, these adept warriors have forged themselves into a potent force dedicated to protecting the innocent.” Their hit die is a d10, their primary abilities are strength or dexterity and intelligence or wisdom, and their saving abilities are dexterity and intelligence. 


There is so much more to these classes than meets the eye. You also have to pick an alignment of how you wish to behave during gameplay. Personally, I like to play a chaotic good alignment for most of my characters. I might consider playing a chaotic evil alignment for a future character.


For those wishing to play their character in a sometimes-kind position, there is: 

Lawful Good, Neutral Good, and Chaotic Good.


For those wishing to play their character in a more neutral way, there is: 

Lawful Neutral, True Neutral, and Chaotic Neutral.


Finally, there is an evil alignment for those that wish to be wicked with:

Lawful Evil, Neutral Evil, and Chaotic Evil.


To try and explain these alignments visually, I am bringing in this funny graph I found--complete with characters you might recognize. If you don’t recognize them, I am going to explain who and what they are from to help you: 


  • Superman from the comic books and movies as Lawful Good,  

  • Malcolm Reynolds from Serenity and Firefly as Neutral Good,  

  • V from the movie V for Vendetta as Chaotic Good,  

  • Captain Picard from Star Trek: TNG as Lawful Neutral,  

  • Treebeard aka Fangorn from LOTR as True Neutral,  

  • Captain Jack Sparrow from the movie series The Pirates of the Caribbean as Chaotic Neutral,  

  • Darth Vader from the movie series Star Wars as Lawful Evil,  

  • Alien from the movie Alien as Neutral Evil,  

  • and finally, Heath Ledger’s Joker from the movie The Dark Knight as Chaotic Evil.



When I was fresh to the RPG world, I used to barge into situations and play as a Barbarian frequently. Now that I have determined that is not the best mindset around 98% of the time and I must think things through. I generally play as a Paladin with a secretive past. Sometimes my character behaves this way because they do not share much, other times this is because they do not remember much of their childhood and upbringing. 


Summer is almost here and the Spring 2024 semester is winding down. It's been hot here and I know that I absolutely hate warming up my house even more with the oven when it begins to get hot. For this reason, I am going to share a recipe for something that doe not require you to use the oven. I am going to share a salad perfect for the times that you don't want to heat up your house:


Wood Forest Salad

This colorful, flower-infused wild-leaf medley with vibrant citrus accents is a quintessential salad of the Kagonesti elves of Krynn. These ancient elves harbor a deep reverence for nature and a refined, almost instinctual, tongue when it comes to culinary combinations. Sometimes called "chopforest" among the wood elves of Toril and Oerth, this bountiful, verdant mix is brimming with sharp accents and crisp textures that almost magically share the palate with the subtler foraged flavors at play. It's as much a visual trip through Ansalon's western woods, from the forest floor all the way to the highest-reaching branches, as it is an edible one.


SERVES 4 TO 6

  • 1 orange

  • 1 lemon

  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar

  • 1 tablespoon honey

  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 small shallot, finely chopped

  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

  • 1 pound brussels sprouts, trimmed, halved, and very thinly sliced

  • 1/2 small head radicchio, thinly sliced; long strands cut in half, if necessary

  • 1 bundle fresh chives, chopped (about 3/4 cup), or fresh dill

  • Edible flowers, such as nasturtiums or pansies, for sprinkling (optional)

Finely grate 1 teaspoon of zest from both the orange and the lemon. Transfer the zest to a large salad bowl. Squeeze 2 teaspoons of juice from the lemon and add it to the bowl along with the vinegar, honey, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste and whisk to combine. Add the shallot and set aside for the flavors to blend, about 10 minutes

While whisking vigorously, add the olive oil to the bowl in a slow, steady stream to combine and emulsify the dressing. Taste and adjust the seasoning with additional salt and pepper, if necessary. Add the brussel sprouts, toss to coat with the dressing, and set aside for them to begin to soften, about 30 minutes.


Meanwhile, peel the orange, trim away any residual bits of pith, thinly slice the fruit, and cut the slices into quarters. Add the radicchio and the chives to the sprouts, toss to combine. Add the orange pieces and toss lightly to distribute. Taste and adjust the seasoning with additional salt and pepper, if necessary. Sprinkle the edible flowers (if using) over the salad and serve. 


This is a picture straight from the Heroes Feast Cookbook of this salad:



One of things I wanted to do during this series of blog posts way to have a live D&D gaming session, and I am so thankful that I have a wonderful professor who is completely willing to jump in and do this with me! So I bid you farewell and I leave you with a parting gift of highlights from our recorded D&D session. This is of myself playing as Lilith (a 6'4" sometimes gassy Tiefling with red skin and black hair), Professor Bekah Wall playing as Loradove SparkleFritz (a 3'7" female Rock Gnome with an obsession of all types of danishes), and an Anonymous WHS Sophomore playing as Geralt (a 5'6" male Tabaxi with a black and white splotched fur coat) they are also our Dungeon Master. Simply click the link below and enjoy!






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